10 FEB 2018 by ideonexus

 Principles of Adult Behavior by John Perry Barlow

Be patient. No matter what. Don’t badmouth: Assign responsibility, not blame. Say nothing of another you wouldn’t say to him. Never assume the motives of others are, to them, less noble than yours are to you. Expand your sense of the possible. Don’t trouble yourself with matters you truly cannot change. Expect no more of anyone than you can deliver yourself. Tolerate ambiguity. Laugh at yourself frequently. Concern yourself with what is right rather than who is right. Never forget that,...
Folksonomies: morality maturity
Folksonomies: morality maturity
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05 JAN 2017 by ideonexus

 Don't Neglect Your Future You

There is one person whose wants and needs you routinely ignore, opting instead to tend to your own immediate desires, and that person is future you. When it comes to making decisions that will have some effect on your long-term health or happiness — for example, whether or not to go to the gym today, in keeping with your New Year’s resolution — current you is always finding a new way to steal from future you. It’s time the two yous got better acquainted. This concept in itself may n...
Folksonomies: prescience future planning
Folksonomies: prescience future planning
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19 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 The Chain of Human Rights to Morphological Freedom

The right to life, the right to not have other people prevent oneself from surviving, is a central right, without which all other rights have no meaning. But to realize the right to life we need other rights. Another central right for any humanistic view of human rights is the right to seek happiness. Without it human flourishing is unprotected, and there is not much point in having a freedom to live if it will not be at least a potentially happy life. In a way the right to life follows from...
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From Anders Sandberg's "Morphological Freedom – Why We Not Just Want It, but Need It"

20 DEC 2014 by ideonexus

 The Moving Goalposts of Success

The absence of disease is not health. Here's how we get to health: We need to reverse the formula for happiness and success. In the last three years, I've traveled to 45 different countries, working with schools and companies in the midst of an economic downturn. And what I found is that most companies and schools follow a formula for success, which is this: If I work harder, I'll be more successful. And if I'm more successful, then I'll be happier. That undergirds most of our parenting style...
Folksonomies: happiness success
Folksonomies: happiness success
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15 OCT 2014 by ideonexus

 The Conflict of What We Desire to Do and What We Are Able...

What if someone who had the potential to discover a formula to unlock the mysteries of the universe wanted to become a pulp fiction writer? What if someone who had the potential to create unparalleled gastronomic delicacies had his heart set on civil engineering? There is what we desire to do, and what we are able to do. When those two things don't coincide, which path should we pursue to find happiness?
Folksonomies: purpose
Folksonomies: purpose
  1  notes
 
21 JUN 2014 by ideonexus

 External VS Internal Hapiness

Many different competing theories of happiness have emerged from the field of positive psychology, but if there’s one thing virtually all positive psychologists agree on, it’s this: there are many ways to be happy, but we cannot find happiness. No object, no event, no outcome or life circumstance can deliver real happiness to us. We have to make our own happiness—by working hard at activities that provide their own reward.15 When we try to find happiness outside of ourselves, we’re f...
Folksonomies: happiness gamification
Folksonomies: happiness gamification
  1  notes

Make your own happiness. Auto-telik

21 JUN 2014 by ideonexus

 Entertaining Work is a Moral Issue

I’m not the first person to notice that reality is broken compared with games, especially when it comes to giving us good, hard work. In fact, the science of happiness was first born thirty-five years ago, when an American psychologist by the name of Mihály Csíkszentmihályi observed the very same thing. In 1975, Csíkszentmihályi published a groundbreaking scientific study called Beyond Boredom and Anxiety. The focus of the study was a specific kind of happiness that Csíkszentmihályi ...
Folksonomies: gamification
Folksonomies: gamification
  1  notes

Isn't this also a matter of perspective? Don't we need to look at life like a game?

The problem is that real-life isn't like a game. A really tough programming problem doesn't match my skills, they can go far beyond them.

Education is ENGINEERED, so it can be like a game.

30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Science is the Enemy of Kings

Kings and Priests have, in some cases, made partial pretensions to patronize the Arts and Sciences, as a cloak for their enmity towards them. They ever were, and ever will be, in reality, their direst foes. An advanced state of Science cannot benefit them. Their present distinctions, and misery-begetting splendour, could not be tolerated, when mankind shall so far be illuminated as to know the real cause and object of animal-existence. Common sense teaches us that good government requires non...
Folksonomies: science government
Folksonomies: science government
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By getting to the roots of all things, it usurps their pretensions to power.

28 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 Happiness as a Psychiatric Disorder

It is perhaps premature to attempt an exact definition of happiness. However, despite the fact that formal diagnostic criteria have yet to be agreed, it seems likely that happiness has affective, cognitive and behavioural components. Thus, happiness is usually characterised by a positive mood, sometimes described as 'elation' or 'joy', although this may be relatively absent in the milder happy states, sometimes termed 'contentment'. Argyle, in his review of the relevant empirical literature, ...
Folksonomies: disorder psychiatry
Folksonomies: disorder psychiatry
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Happiness makes people irrational, gives them a skewed perception of themselves and others, and instill them with a desire to make others happy--a mirror of why depression is seen as a disorder.

19 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 How Do We Nourish the Revolution?

Every thing tells us that we are approaching the era of one of the grand revolutions of the human race. What can better enlighten us to what we may expect, what can be a surer guide to us, amidst its commotions, than the picture of the revolutions that have preceded and prepared the way for it? The present state of knowledge assures us that it will be happy. But is it not upon condition that we know how to assist it with all our strength? And, that the happiness it promises may be less dearly...
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We are in a society that is experiencing accelerating happiness, accelerating technology, and social progress. The progress is inevitable, but we must understand it in order to encourage it and recognize the pitfalls it may experience.