16 APR 2018 by ideonexus

 Euclid's Elements as a Game

"If video games had been around in 350 BC, Euclid would have made a video game," Devlin told me. The thirteen books of Euclid's Elements would have been the supplemental material, a PDF file that you could read if you wanted to. "People think I'm joking—I absolutely mean that. Euclid would not have written a textbook, he would have designed a video game." Peek at any of his proofs, Devlin said, and you'll quickly find that the great Greek mathematician, often called the father of geometry, ...
Folksonomies: mathematics classics gaming
Folksonomies: mathematics classics gaming
  1  notes
 
27 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 History of the Concept of Art

Nowadays when someone speaks of "art" you probably think first of "fine arts" such as painting and sculpture, but before the twentieth century the word was generally used in quite a different sense. Since this older meaning of "art" still survives in many idioms, especially when we are contrasting art with science, I would like to spend the next few minutes talking about art in its classical sense. In medieval times, the first universities were established to teach the seven so-called "liber...
Folksonomies: science art humanities
Folksonomies: science art humanities
  1  notes
 
24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Superstring Theory

It is time now to try to describe what a superstring really is. Here I run into the same difficulty which the geometer Euclid encountered 2,200 years ago. Euclid was trying to convey to his readers his idea of a geometrical point. For this purpose he gave his famous definition of a point: "A point is that which has no parts, or which has no magnitude." This definition would not be very helpful to somebody who was ignorant of geometry and wanted to understand what a point was. Euclid's notion ...
  1  notes
 
24 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 Geometry Sets the Mind Right

Geometry enlightens the intellect and sets one's mind right. All its proofs are very clear and orderly. It is hardly possible for errors to enter into geometrical reasoning, because it is well arranged and orderly. Thus, the mind that constantly applies itself to geometry is not likely to fall into error. In this convenient way, the person who knows geometry acquires intelligence. It has been assumed that the followmg statement was written Upon Plato's door: 'No one who is not a geometrician ...
Folksonomies: mathematics meditation
Folksonomies: mathematics meditation
  1  notes

Makes me think about mindfulness meditation, which is fine, but there are meditative practices that are proactive as well.

12 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Geometry Seems Disconnected from Reality

Why is geometry often described as 'cold' and 'dry?' One reason lies in its inability to describe the shape of a cloud, a mountain, a coastline, or a tree. Clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones, coastlines are not circles, and bark is not smooth, nor does lightning travel in a straight line... Nature exhibits not simply a higher degree but an altogether different level of complexity.
Folksonomies: complexity geometry
Folksonomies: complexity geometry
  1  notes

It deals with orbs and squares, but clouds and trees are much more complex.

17 MAY 2012 by ideonexus

 Engineering Requires Science

Engineering is quite different from science. Scientists try to understand nature. Engineers try to make things that do not exist in nature. Engineers stress invention. To embody an invention the engineer must put his idea in concrete terms, and design something that people can use. That something can be a device, a gadget, a material, a method, a computing program, an innovative experiment, a new solution to a problem, or an improvement on what is existing. Since a design has to be concrete, ...
Folksonomies: science engineering
Folksonomies: science engineering
  1  notes

Science passively observes, but Engineering must discover what it needs in order to make progress.

31 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Courses That Appealed to Steven Chu

I approached the bulk of my schoolwork as a chore rather than an intellectual adventure. The tedium was relieved by a few courses that seem to be qualitatively different. Geometry was the first exciting course I remember. Instead of memorizing facts, we were asked to think in clear, logical steps. Beginning from a few intuitive postulates, far reaching consequences could be derived, and I took immediately to the sport of proving theorems.
Folksonomies: education
Folksonomies: education
  1  notes

He enjoyed Geometry for the process rather than the boring memorization of facts.

19 APR 2011 by ideonexus

 Hobbes Conversion to Science

He was 40 yeares old before he looked on geometry; which happened accidentally. Being in a gentleman's library, Euclid's Elements lay open, and 'twas the 47 El. libri I. He read the proposition. 'By G—,' sayd he, (He would now and then sweare, by way of emphasis) 'By G—,' sayd he, 'this is impossible!' So he reads the demonstration of it, which re¬ ferred him back to such a proposition; which proposition he read. That referred him back to another, which he also read. Et sic deinceps, tha...
  1  notes

Aubrey describes Thomas Hobbes falling in love with Geometry.