06 JAN 2018 by ideonexus

 Review Your Social Media Timeline to Improve Your Sense o...

In an experiment at Cornell, stressed college students randomly assigned to scroll through their own Facebook profiles for five minutes experienced boosts in self-affirmation compared to students who looked at a stranger’s Facebook profile. The researchers believe self-affirmation comes from reminiscing on past meaningful interactions — seeing photos they had been tagged in and comments their friends had left — as well as reflecting on one’s own past posts, where a person chooses how ...
Folksonomies: social media self-worth
Folksonomies: social media self-worth
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26 SEP 2013 by ideonexus

 Popular Science Shuts Down Comments

Comments can be bad for science. That's why, here at PopularScience.com, we're shutting them off. [...] ...even a fractious minority wields enough power to skew a reader's perception of a story, recent research suggests. In one study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison professor Dominique Brossard, 1,183 Americans read a fake blog post on nanotechnology and revealed in survey questions how they felt about the subject (are they wary of the benefits or supportive?). Then, through a randoml...
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Comments on articles erode the public's trust in science.

04 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 The BRAIN Initiative

As humans, we can identify galaxies light years away, we can study particles smaller than an atom. But we still haven’t unlocked the mystery of the three pounds of matter that sits between our ears. (Laughter.) But today, scientists possess the capability to study individual neurons and figure out the main functions of certain areas of the brain. But a human brain contains almost 100 billion neurons making trillions of connections. So Dr. Collins says it’s like listening to the strin...
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Text of Obama's comments on the initiative itself.

These are notes summarizing comments made by speakers and audience during this session:

  • Are you a geek? When telling a story, how often do you elaborate on the details? Baseball stat geek, science detail geek, D&D geek, all about details.
  • What actually constitutes a geek?
  • Student: it’s good to be a geek, it means someone who is passionate about something.
  • Student: Geek is starting to be glamorized. Big Bang Theory, Harry Potter movie.
  • Radio Show Host: compares herself to scientists, and doesn’t think herself a geek, but the audience is geeks (Skeptically Speaking). Considers herself a translator. Geeks listen more closely to the show, and send emails. Geeks provide feedback.
  • “You call it geekery, I call it passion.”
  • Geeks distrust social niceties. Why aren't they just giving me the information straight? Tendency towards argumentation.
  • What are Benefits and Pitfalls of a Geeky audience? Bonus is passion. Geeks get immersed in details, and have a self-generating energy and will keep working through things left to their own.
  • Geeks don’t see correcting others as a slight.
  • Accuracy VS Completeness: don’t ever say false things, but you don’t have to get totally immersed.
  • Geeks are obsessive enough that they will voluntarily seek out details on their own.
  • How to delineate between being too geeky and not geeky enough? Keep things entertaining as a means of keeping people with your content. If it’s entertaining, people will stick with you through the sciency parts.
  • Make sure your headline and introduction are not for geeks, but you can geek out later in the story. Skeptchick uses humor to open all posts, post about Twilight.  Scicurious has posts that reach out to her audience, Friday posts about sex.
  • Catchphrases and Inside Jokes create communities, but they also put up walls to communities.
  • Surprise people with a story, ask a question to pique curiosity about how it will affect people personally,
  • Whatstheharm.net – anecdotes. Turns on non-geeks, but turns off geeks because we want data. What’s the difference between whatstheharm.net and Rush Limbaugh using anecdotes to hurt science?
  • Snark: a way of building a community, but causes pile-ons, turns off outsiders, PZMeyers’ fans attack whoever he points them too. Snark is the nature of the Internet. Radio difference: no snark rule.
  • Use snark to empower the weak against the powerful. Use it against trolls against power.
  • Try going with a private comment first before going public.
  • Remember that it’s the internet, your tone doesn't communicate in the text.
  • Don’t do threaded comments.
  • You’re going to offend someone. Radio got called a Marxist for her show on gender. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

01 JAN 2010 by ideonexus

 Debate Principle: Assume good faith

Assuming good faith is a fundamental principle on Wikipedia. It is the assumption that editors' edits and comments are made in good faith. Most people try to help the project, not hurt it. If this were false, a project like Wikipedia would be doomed from the beginning. ...When doubt is cast on good faith, continue to assume good faith yourself where you can. Be civil and follow dispute resolution processes, rather than attacking editors or edit warring with them. If you wish to express doubts...
Folksonomies: centrism
Folksonomies: centrism
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This is one of the principles wikipedia asks its contributors to apply when working with other editors. On a meta level, we should all apply this principle, even in politics, because we all want what's best for the country even though we tend to vilify our ideological opponents.