18 MAY 2017 by ideonexus

 Emergent Curriculum

Whereas teachers and school boards typically decide in advance what knowledge children should receive based on their age, emergent curriculum is the technique of letting topics for study arise out of student interests and actions. Curriculum becomes what actually happens, rather than what was planned to happen. After all, children design their own “curriculum” all the time, simply by playing in, exploring, and studying the world. In schools inspired by the Italian Reggio-Emilia approach, ...
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30 MAY 2015 by ideonexus

 Risk of Childhood Kidnapping are Very Low

A generation ago 70 percent of children played outside; today the rate is down to 30 percent.209 In 2008 the nine-year-old son of the journalist Lenore Skenazy begged her to let him go home by himself on the New York subway. She agreed, and he made it home without incident. When she wrote about the vignette in a New York Sun column, she found herself at the center of a media frenzy in which she was dubbed “America’s Worst Mom.” (Sample headline: “Mom Lets 9-Year-Old Take Subway Home A...
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03 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 The Give-N Task for Assessing Child Number Knowledge

Children learn very early (often as young as 2 years old) to recite the number-word list in order (Fuson, 1988). But at the beginning, the words are merely placeholders—children recite the list without knowing what the individual number words mean. Over time, children fill in the words with meaning, one at a time and in order (Carey, 2009; Sarnecka & Lee, 2009). The child’s progress on this front is called their number-knower level, or just knower level. A child who does not yet know ...
Folksonomies: education mathematics
Folksonomies: education mathematics
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There is also an excel spreadsheet referenced inth

30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 The Tapping Game

The tapping game is when I tap one time, you tap two times, and when I tap two times, you tap one time. Children play this game sixteen times, mixing up the times that children are asked to tap once when the experimenter taps twice, and tap twice when the experimenter taps once. In other words, the rules of the game keep changing, and the children need to apply their focus and attention to follow what’s going on. Blair says: What happens with four-year-olds is, in general, they’ll hang in...
Folksonomies: games parenting
Folksonomies: games parenting
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A game for children to learn focus.

04 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Schools Kill a Child's Curiosity

All children are curious and I wonder by what process this trait becomes developed in some and suppressed in others. I suspect again that schools and colleges help in the suppression insofar as they meet curiosity by giving the answers, rather than by some method that leads from narrower questions to broader questions. It is hard to satisfy the curiosity of a child, and even harder to satisfy the curiosity of a scientist, and methods that meet curiosity with satisfaction are thus not apt to f...
Folksonomies: education curiosity
Folksonomies: education curiosity
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By giving them answers instead of letting them find the answers themselves. If adults maintained a questioning attitude, they would question authority.

29 AUG 2011 by ideonexus

 Adults Should Share in Children's Discovery to Relive The...

If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement and mystery of the world we live in.
Folksonomies: education wonder parenting
Folksonomies: education wonder parenting
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Cleveland Abbe quote about the importance of children having an adult companion to share the child's experiences of discovery and mystery.

31 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 Recommendations for Exposing Children to Television

1. Keep the TV off before the child turns 2. I know this is tough to hear for parents who need a break. If you can’t turn it off—if you haven’t created those social networks that can allow you a rest—at least limit your child’s exposure to TV. We live in the real world, after all, and an irritated, overextended parent can be just as harmful to a child’s development as an annoying purple dinosaur. 2. After age 2, help your children choose the shows (and other screen-based expos...
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No television before age two, and when television is introduced, limit consumption and use watching television as a chance for interaction to have the child think critically about what they are seeing.

24 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 How to Provide Language Enrichment to Children

First of all, language stimulation should begin very early: by just three years of age, children are already headed down vastly different paths of verbal achievement as a result of their cumulative experience with language. Ideally, language stimulation should begin at birth, since we know that newborns' brains are already attuned to human speech and immediately start learning the sounds of their mother tongue. In fact. Fowler's group found that babies who entered their program between six a...
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Begin stimulating the child early, provide as much quantity of language stimulation as possible, and pay attention to the quality of language, making it age-appropriate and clearly enunciated.

07 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 When Babies Learn About Perspective

Alison and Andy designed an experiment to test this idea further. First they set up an imitation game: you give the toy to me and I'll give it to you; you put the sticker on my hand and I'll put it on your hand. Children are very good at this and love doing it. Then Alison and Andy put a screen on the table between the experimenter and the child. The experimenter hid a toy from the child by placing it on her side of the screen. Then she gave the toy to the child and asked him to hide it from ...
Folksonomies: babies learning development
Folksonomies: babies learning development
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Before the age of three, babies learn that the perspective of other people differs from their own.

29 JUN 2011 by ideonexus

 Differing Definitions of Intelligence in Children

;ct. What parents want even influences the very ways they label children. Sara Harkness and Charles Super found that when parents in three cultures were asked about intelligence, their views of what constitutes a smart child differed.^^ In America, an "intelligent" child is one who is aggressive and competitive; in Holland, die intelligent child is one who is persistent, strong-willed, and demonstrates a clarity of purpose; for the Kipsigis Africans, the most intelligent child is the responsi...
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Three cultures and their definition of what fosters intelligence in a child.