27 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Anti-Suburbia Books from the 1950s

Mary and John are the unfortunate (fictional) protagonists of The Crack in the Picture Window, published in 1957 by John Keats, a journalist at the now defunct Washington Daily News. A lacerating (and very funny) indictment of postwar suburbs as "fresh-air slums," Keats’s polemic sold millions of copies in paperback. It revolves around the tragicomic story of the Drones, a nice young couple gulled, first, into buying a box at Rolling Knolls Estates, and then into thinking a larger, more e...
Folksonomies: culture suburbia
Folksonomies: culture suburbia
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25 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Political Pragmatism

A reasonable and logical way of doing things or of thinking about problems that is based on dealing with specific situations instead of on ideas and theories. An approach to philosophy, primarily held by American philosophers, which holds that the truth or meaning of a statement is to be measured by its practical (i.e., pragmatic) consequences. William James and John Dewey were pragmatists. Pragmatism in common usage may mean simply a practical approach to problems and affairs. But it’s al...
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24 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Busyness Correlated with Improved Cognitive Performance

Sustained engagement in mentally challenging activities has been shown to improve memory in older adults. We hypothesized that a busy schedule would be a proxy for an engaged lifestyle and would facilitate cognition. Here, we examined the relationship between busyness and cognition in adults aged 50–89. Participants (N = 330) from the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study (DLBS) completed a cognitive battery and the Martin and Park Environmental Demands Questionnaire (MPED), an assessment of busyness...
Folksonomies: cognition aging
Folksonomies: cognition aging
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21 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Essay Writing is About Figuring Things Out

To understand what a real essay is, we have to reach back into history again, though this time not so far. To Michel de Montaigne, who in 1580 published a book of what he called "essais." He was doing something quite different from what lawyers do, and the difference is embodied in the name. Essayer is the French verb meaning "to try" and an essai is an attempt. An essay is something you write to try to figure something out. Figure out what? You don't know yet. And so you can't begin with a ...
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21 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Essays Should Not Need to Argue a Point

The Age of the Essay September 2004 Remember the essays you had to write in high school? Topic sentence, introductory paragraph, supporting paragraphs, conclusion. The conclusion being, say, that Ahab in Moby Dick was a Christ-like figure. Oy. So I'm going to try to give the other side of the story: what an essay really is, and how you write one. Or at least, how I write one. Mods The most obvious difference between real essays and the things one has to write in school is that real ess...
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10 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 The Classroom Library Checklist

Classroom Library Environment The classroom has a clearly designated, accessible, and inviting library space. The classroom has several areas for students to read comfortably. Classroom rituals and routines are established to support student self-management of independent reading. The library area has room for 3 or 4 students to review and select texts. Classroom Library Content I have at least 15 to 20 texts for each student. There is a balance of fiction and informational texts. The selec...
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10 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Characteristics of a Literacy-Building Classroom Library

• 300-600 books • Wide range of reading difficulty • Permanent “core” collection and regularly replenished “revolving” collection • Variety of genres • New books with appealing covers • Attractive, inviting setting The literature selection should include: • Traditional stories: Familiar stories that are found in every culture, including fables, folk tales, myths and legends • Fantasy: Stories that contain characters who may have superhuman powers that spark children...
Folksonomies: literacy reading library
Folksonomies: literacy reading library
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10 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Reading: Six Elements for Every Child Every Day

1. Every child reads something he or she chooses. 2. Every child reads accurately. 3. Every child reads something he or she understands. 4. Every child writes about something personally meaningful. 5. Every child talks with peers about reading and writing. 6. Every child listens to a fluent adult read aloud.
Folksonomies: education reading
Folksonomies: education reading
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10 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Change Requires Listening

...change requires more than just speaking out -- it requires listening, as well. In particular, it requires listening to those with whom you disagree, and being prepared to compromise... you need allies in a democracy. That's just the way it is. It can be frustrating and it can be slow. But history teaches us that the alternative to democracy is always worse. That's not just true in this country. It’s not a black or white thing. Go to any country where the give and take of democracy...
Folksonomies: politics rhetoric debate
Folksonomies: politics rhetoric debate
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10 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 You Need More than Passion to Change the World

You have to go through life with more than just passion for change; you need a strategy. I'll repeat that. I want you to have passion, but you have to have a strategy. Not just awareness, but action. Not just hashtags, but votes. [...] But to bring about structural change, lasting change, awareness is not enough. It requires changes in law, changes in custom. If you care about mass incarceration, let me ask you: How are you pressuring members of Congress to pass the criminal justice ...
Folksonomies: politics passion change
Folksonomies: politics passion change
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